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Tag Archives | Fall 2018 Issue Highlights

Our Fabulous Faux Fall

Recipes and Photography by Ellise Pierce

If you’ve lived in North Texas for any length of time, then you already know that fall here is basically summer 2.0. Great for those who love the heat. But even for those of us who don’t, it means that some summer produce will just keep on going and, in some cases, yield another growing season, just as the first fall fruits and vegetables arrive.…

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What’s In Season: Fall 2018

EARLY FALL

Beans and Peas (fresh shell and snap)
Corn
Cucumber
Eggplant
Figs
Melons
Okra
Peppers
Squash
Tomatoes
Watermelon

LATE FALL

Apples
Arugula
Beets
Broccoli
Cauli ower
Cabbage
Carrots
Celery
Chard
Collards
Fava Beans
Kale
Lettuce
Mustard Greens
Pears
Pecans
Persimmons
Pomegranates
Potatoes
Pumpkins
Radishes
Rutabaga
Spinach
Squash (winter varieties)
Sweet Potatoes
Turnips

For a list of local YOU-PICK-IT farms, go to edibledfw.com…

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Our Seasonal Pick: Pecans Yes, Pie No


photo: istockphoto.com/Amarita

Sometime in the fall, a large wooden bowl would always appear on the marble coffee table, filled with round and wrinkly walnuts, tear-shaped almonds with pinholes in their light shells, Brazil nuts that looked like bear claws and the most exotic-looking of all, the ones with the black tiger stripes—pecans.…

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Edible Politics: A Conversation with the Candidates

Learn About Our Texas Ag Contenders

In November, Democrat Kim Olson will challenge Republican incumbent Sid Miller in the race for Texas Agriculture Commissioner. It’s an office that uniquely affects areas of interest to Edible Dallas & Fort Worth readers: clean, locally and sustainably grown fruits, vegetables, meat and dairy, as well as Texas wines, artisan foods and farmers markets.…

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Edible Notables: Fall 2018

Cold-Pressed for Success


Photo credit: Teresa Rafidi

When Hailey Nutt and Brenton Phillips first dreamed up Tribal in 2014, they were thinking café. But their cold-pressed juice line wound up coming first after they partnered with Southern Methodist University to create Pony Up, a healthier, juice substitute for sports drinks.…

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