• Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Instagram
  • PInterest

Eggnog

eggnog
photo by Kelly Yandell

by Dotty Griffith from The Texas Holiday Cookbook

The punch bowls of England and the hospitality of the Old South bring to mind the rich Christmas beverage we know as eggnog. This version, using a boiled custard, has scant resemblance to gooey commercially prepared eggnog available in refrigerator case. This is lighter, much more like a milk punch. With spirits added, this punch can be potent. Of course, it can be served without. Make two batches of eggnog, one with and the other without spirits for kids and those who don’t imbibe. Make sure guests know they have an option.

6-8 Servings

⅔ cup sugar
4 egg yolks (reserve white for another use or discard)
½ teaspoon salt
8 cups milk
1 tablespoon vanilla
1 cup bourbon, dark rum or brandy, optional or to taste
1 cup whipping cream
Ground nutmeg

In large saucepan, combine sugar and egg yolks. Beat until smooth and light yellow in color. Add salt and stir in milk. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture bubbles and thickens enough to coat the back of a spoon.

Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. Place custard in rigid refrigerator container or pitcher with lid. Stir in spirits, if desired. Place a layer of plastic wrap directly on custard. Place lid on container and refrigerate to cool completely, 3 to 4 hours.

Just before serving, whip cream until peaks form. Pour chilled eggnog into a chilled punch bowl and garnish with dollops of whipped cream floating on top. Sprinkle with nutmeg.

Reprinted with permission from THE TEXAS HOLIDAY COOKBOOK – Second Edition ©2013 by Dotty Griffith, Taylor Trade Publishing, an imprint of The Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, Inc

This version, using a boiled custard, has scant resemblance to gooey commercially prepared eggnog available in refrigerator case. This is lighter, much more like a milk punch.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply